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FIRST ARTISTS ANNOUNCED FOR SYDNEY DRUM & PERCUSSION SHOW

Posted in Blog, Sydney Drum Show News    //    Post Date - March 3, 2017
Michael Schack-5090

Michael Schack (Belgium)

Australian Musician and the Australian Music Association (the team that brings you the exciting, annual Melbourne Guitar Show) are proud to present the inaugural Sydney Drum and Percussion Show May 27 & 28, 2017 Rosehill Gardens Grand Pavilion. It promises to be an exciting presentation of all things hit. The live performance program will feature some of the world’s best players, as well as a huge array of drum gear. There’ll be orchestral percussion, electronic percussion, drum sets, cymbals, hand percussion and accessories from the major brands you know and love, plus gear you’ve never seen before. There’ll be some tasty home grown and hand made gear too.

In addition to this, the Sydney Drum & Percussion Show will host information seminars, demonstrations, and live performances from Australia’s most talented drummers and percussion players. From double-kick drummers, groove and touch drummers and jazz stylists, to exotic percussion players, orchestral percussionists, and hard hittin’ rock n rollers, they’ll all be at the Sydney Drum & Percussion Show. This is a hands-on show so come and be a part of it. Never been behind a kit before? Here’s your chance. Participate in a drum circle on both days. It will put a smile on your face – guaranteed. Experience the latest electronic drum technology and meet the drummers behind some of your favourite bands. Learn stuff! Take part in Workshops, performance clinics, and panels. And see some of the world’s best players live.

FIRST ARTISTS ANNOUNCED:
Michael Schack-5119In our first peek at the artist lineup, we are thrilled to announced acclaimed Belgian drummer MICHAEL SCHACK. Over the years, Michael has won several awards, has been nominated for “best clinician/ demonstrator” in international drummer magazine polls and just recently (Feb 2017) received the E-drummer Of The Year award for the third time. He’s also an affiliate instructor on drumeo.com and has contributed to the development of Roland’s V-Drums and E-pads since the early 2000’s.

 

luciusSince sitting behind a kit for the first time at the age of 3, LUCIUS BORICH has established a reputation as being one of Australia’s finest and most flexible drummers. In 1998, Lucius formed the highly regarded prog rock band Cog, who have gone on to become one of the most successful independent bands. We’re thrilled to have Lucius onboard for the inaugural Sydney Drum & Percussion Show.

 

LOZZBENSONloAlso announced for the SD&PS is singer, songwriter, band leader LOZZ BENSON. Lozz has played and toured with well-established Sydney acts including Urthboy, Pat Capocci, The Drey Rollan Band, Drummer Queens, The JHD Revival Band, Sirens Big Band and Rackett. Lozz is well known and respected in the Sydney music scene as “That Red Head”. Her old school style rockabilly trio blends blues and country together with a dash of punk attitude. Lozz recently received the AUDW Best Female Drummer Award.

 

GangbWWe’re also delighted to present the highly acclaimed GANG OF BROTHERS. Led by vibrant drummer, vocalist Buddy Siolo and featuring the amazingly talented brothers Andro, Dauno, Fenix and Banel Martinez, Sydney’s Gang of Brothers offer a cross-genre, musical assault you’re not going to want to miss. With their seriously phat grooves, and culturally diverse rhythms, this band will rock your funky socks off.

 

 More major artists will be announced in the weeks leading up to the show.

The voice of the Australian music products industry, the Australian Music Association (AMA) will be teaming up with Australian Musician and other media partners such as Beat/Mixdown, Drumscene magazine and Digital Drummer to present an amazing drum-centric weekend. Based on the successful model of the Melbourne Guitar Show, the SD&PS will showcase all that is new and exciting in drums and percussion. The show is dedicated solely to all things percussion and its associated technologies and published materials, the exhibition will showcase all the biggest brands in this fiercely loyal product category, plus names and instruments you don’t see every day in your local music store. Plus there will be some special one-off SD&PS deals available over the weekend.

Describing the exciting developments, SDPS organiser, Rob Walker says, “”We are excited to be able to present the inaugural Sydney Drum & Percussion Show. There’s so much about percussion. It’s the world’s most accessible form of music – people take their first steps in music through percussion. We are excited to showcase our industry’s products and the wealth of local talent that Sydney and Australia has to offer as well as some international guests – we want to grow our drum & percussion community, educate and entertain you.”

If you can hit it, ring it, shake rattle and roll it, it’ll be at the Sydney Drum & Percussion Show

The Sydney Drum & Percussion Show will be held at Rosehill Gardens Grand Pavilion on May 27 & 28, 2017.

SYDNEY DRUM & PERCUSSION SHOW DETAILS
SATURDAY MAY 27   10.00am – 6.00pm
SUNDAY MAY 28   10.00am – 6.00pm

Keep an eye on the website for more information as it comes to hand

 

 

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GERRY PANTAZIS INVITES YOU TO THE SYDNEY DRUM & PERCUSSION SHOW

Posted in Sydney Drum Show News    //    Post Date - February 27, 2017

As one of Australia’s most sought after drummers, Gerry Pantazis has performed and/or recorded with a wide array of artists including Larry Carlton (USA), Tommy Emmanuel, Bachelor Girl, Guy Sebastian, Anthony Callea, David Campbell, Doug Parkinson, Lisa Edwards, Peter Cupples, Olivia Newton John, Stylus, Silvia Paladino, The Seekers, Roachford (UK) and Geoff Achison to name a few. Gerry took some time out to invite everyone down to the Sydney Drum and Percussion Show May 27 & 28 Rosehill Gardens Grand Pavilion. Stay tuned for some great drum tip videos from Gerry too.

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NAMM 2017: YAMAHA 50TH ANNIVERSARY DRUM KIT

Posted in Gear, Percussion, Sydney Drum Show News    //    Post Date - February 6, 2017

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Yamaha drums—50 years in the pursuit of sound and performance perfection

Based on Yamaha’s renowned Absolute Hybrid Maple kit, revealed at NAMM was the 50th anniversary model features shells with outer plies made from two varieties of beautiful exotic wood, and gold hook lugs that recall the revered Maple Custom set of yesteryear. Specially processed badges and front heads add to the luxurious feel of this limited release of fifty unique, five-piece kits.

Features of the kit include; Exotic Maple on Hybrid Maple Shell,  Gold Hook Lugs, Special Bass Drum Head and anniversary Special Badge

au.yamaha.com

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NAMM 2017: DRUM GEAR ON THE TRADE SHOW FLOOR

Posted in Gear, Percussion, Sydney Drum Show News    //    Post Date - February 3, 2017

Australian Musician presents a selection of acoustic drums and cymbals captured at the NAMM Show

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NAMM 2017: PAISTE 900 SERIES CYMBALS

Posted in Gear, Percussion, Sydney Drum Show News    //    Post Date - January 30, 2017

Yamaha Australia’s Nathan Biggin discusses the new 900 series of Paiste cymbals at the Paiste booth, NAMM 2017.

au.yamaha.com

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AUSTRALIAN DRUMMER KEEPS THE BEAT AT CIRQUE

Posted in Artists, Interviews, Sydney Drum Show News    //    Post Date - December 19, 2016

16_drummer_solo_006-1
Adelaide’s Ben Todd has just wrapped up a role in Cirque du Soleil’s Australian tour of its show Kooza. He tells digitalDrummer editor Allan Leibowitz how he scored the coveted musical role and how electronics help him in the pit.

Allan Leibowitz: So how did you end up playing drums with Cirque?

Ben Todd: I’m from Adelaide and I started playing drums when I was three years old. My dad was a drummer, his dad was a drummer as well, so it was definitely a family thing. I saw my first Cirque du Soleil show when I was about 10 or 11 and it was a real game-changer in terms of where I thought was going to go musically. I originally thought I was going to follow the path of freelancing, just doing what came through Adelaide and playing in a bunch of bands, but when I saw the show (I think it was Saltimbanco that was the first show in Adelaide), it triggered something inside me. It was like, ‘I want to do that!’, seeing all the elements of acrobatics, theatre and, obviously, music.

From then onwards, everything I did musically I tried to approach from the view of helping me get a job with the company one day. So, I learned some more instruments, I learned about composing and arranging, I went to a special-interest music high school, I studied orchestral percussion, played in drumline and Latin percussion and obviously studied electronic percussion including programming and all that kind of thing.

I sent my first audition video into the company when I was 15 years old – that showed pretty much everything I could do: playing a bunch of styles, playing different instruments, and I was fortunate that they liked what they saw. They then sent me some music from their shows and I performed it and sent it back – and that went back and forth over about three years and then eventually, when I was 19, I got my first contract with a show called Corteo for a tour in Japan. And I did that show for about a year and a half and then transferred over to this show, Kooza, and I have been with it since then – with the exception of a two-year break before rejoining in Sydney.

AL: So how many times have you played this particular show?

BT: Wow! I’ve been playing this show all up probably for four years and we do about 360 shows a year, so it’s well over a thousand.

_dsc5635AL: So, the obvious question: are you bored with it yet?

BT: No, I’m not. The thing about the music in Cirque and how the band is utilised, I mean it’s a circus and we’re reacting to live action on stage. So, although there is a score and set music, there are a lot of things that are on call and accents that I have to catch, being a drummer, so all of that stuff changes from night to night. So, there’s no room to get bored with it because it does change so much and as soon as you get into that mindset of just playing it the same way, you’re inevitably going to miss something. So, no, it’s really fresh. And also, the acts change around a little bit. Different people do different acts in the show and that also keeps it fresh. And the score itself allows you to play it differently because a lot of it is kind of ‘70s funk/groove-based stuff, so, as a drummer, you can have real fun with that –within reason.

AL: And do you guys have to practise between performances, or do you all know it now?

BT: We all know it, but we have a sound check an hour and a half before the show every day – just a quick line check to make sure everything still works and also, if anything is going to be different in the show that night, any different transitions or a different version of a different act (like someone doing the act for the first time) or, if we need to modify anything, we’ll run over that. But as it stands, the show musically is set and the band just knows the things that can change.

AL: Let’s talk about gear. From the audience perspective, there’s a huge array of sounds – drums and percussion, but just two of you playing that. So, are there lots of samples and triggering?

BT: There are not a lot of loops – there are some in the show because everything runs off Ableton Live. There are some drum/percussion loops, but most of it is played live either by myself or the percussionist. A lot of the drum sounds change from act to act – every act has a different patch (on the module) and the percussionist has a Roland Handsonic to trigger a lot of stuff that changes from act to act as well.

AL: So, you’re using an electronic kit?

BT: Yes, I’m using a Roland TD-30, with some inbuilt sounds, but also running Kontakt through a Mac Mini. The sounds were specifically chosen by the composer at the time the music was written. Apart from that, I use an acoustic hi-hat and an acoustic snare for some of the more exposed rolls. Originally, the show was built on a TD-20, but when the original gear was replaced, they just did a copy over to the TD-30.

AL: What does the electronic set-up allow you to do that you couldn’t do with an acoustic kit?

BT: I think the thing the composer liked the most was being able to build different-sounding drum kits for each act. I would say maybe 50% of the show is played on the same patch, but the rest is different kits for each act. So, that is obviously a big benefit.

Also, the nature of the band set-up – everyone is really, really close together. I’ve got a guy playing clarinet and tin whistle right there, and trumpet right in front of me, next to the vocalist. I can play a drum kit and still be able to be close with the band and interact with them and not have to be in a booth (which) is great. Visually, it’s good because the audience can see a full band and see a drummer actually playing. And obviously, the big top itself is not the greatest acoustic environment to mix a drum kit in. Electronics give the sound team a lot more control over the mix than they would with an acoustic kit. You know, an acoustic kit wouldn’t fit; it would be too loud in that space and you wouldn’t be able to change the sounds as dramatically. Without electronic drums, there’s just no way the drums would work in this show.

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AL: Just to pick up on one thing – your use of acoustic hats and snare. What’s the reason for that?

BT: It’s like when you hear a recording of MIDI strings and one solo violin in the mix. Just that one acoustic element really helps the overall sound of the kit come to life. I chose an acoustic hi-hat because (I didn’t really like) the sound and response of the V-hats. And also, consistency. I found it really hard to keep it the same every day, whereas with the acoustic hi-hat, it’s great. And also, just by having that one element makes it feel more like playing an acoustic kit. We’ve actually put a custom shield around the hats so they’re acoustically contained – it’s really cool.

AL: You do actually use an acoustic kit in this show, in a very prominent role …

BT: Yes, the drum solo! That’s a miced acoustic kit, built for the show, obviously for the visual aspect. It’s a (clear Perspex) Vistalite design that looks really cool. It’s all individually miced, with a cable snake that runs back from the platform.

AL: And it’s just used for one solo?

BT: Yes, that came about because the guy who wrote the show, David Shiner, is a drummer and has a soft spot for drums and when they were trying to come up with ideas for a feature that was a bit different in the show, he thought why not give the drummer a bit of a spotlight and use that as a transition when they’re striking the Wheel of Death into the next act. It’s great for me. It’s a lot of fun, you know. And in terms of keeping the show fresh and interesting, it’s definitely a point in the show where I can do whatever I want, so if nothing else, I can at least look forward to that.

AL: And what’s next for you?

BT: After Brisbane, this show moves to Melbourne in January and then on to Perth and then to Asia. But I’m joining a new show and beginning in January I leave the tour and start work on the new show.

AL: So, someone else takes over your role for Melbourne and beyond.

BT: Yes, and that’s another beauty of the electronic kit. They’ll use the exact same set-up and there’s no adjustment sound-wise – no tuning, or anything. All he’ll have to get used to is the ‘feel’ of the pads.

Cirque du Soleil will be in Mebourne at Flemington Racecourse from Jan 20 2017 – Mar 12 2017 and then goes on to Belmont Park Racecourse in Perth from Apr 13 2017 – May 7 2017.

Allan Leibowitz is editor of digitalDrummer, a free global magazine for electronic percussion, available online at www.digitaldrummermag.com

GUY LALIBERTE, DAVID SHINER, SERGE ROY, STEPHANE ROY, JEAN-FRANCOIS COTE, CLARENCE FORD, MARIE-CHANTALE VAILLANCOURT, MARTIN LABRECQUE, JONATHAN DEANS, LEON ROTHENBERG, FLORENCE CORNET, ANDRE SIMARD, DANNY ZEN, ROGE FRANCOEUR, BENOIT MATHIEU

GUY LALIBERTE, DAVID SHINER, SERGE ROY, STEPHANE ROY, JEAN-FRANCOIS COTE, CLARENCE FORD, MARIE-CHANTALE VAILLANCOURT, MARTIN LABRECQUE, JONATHAN DEANS, LEON ROTHENBERG, FLORENCE CORNET, ANDRE SIMARD, DANNY ZEN, ROGE FRANCOEUR, BENOIT MATHIEU

 

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SYDNEY DRUM & PERCUSSION SHOW 2017 ANNOUNCED

Posted in Blog, Sydney Drum Show News    //    Post Date - December 8, 2016

drumshowfavouredwkeyline

BEAT IT TO THE SYDNEY DRUM & PERCUSSION SHOW!
From the team that brings you the exciting, annual Melbourne Guitar Show comes the inaugural Sydney Drum & Percussion Show on May 27 & 28, 2017 at Rosehill Gardens Grand Pavilion.  Proudly presented by Australian Musician, the massive exhibition will feature an unbeatable variety of drums, hardware, sticks, percussion, accessories, sheet music and more.

In addition to this, the Sydney Drum & Percussion Show will host information seminars, demonstrations, and live performances from Australia’s most talented drummers and percussion players. Although artists won’t be announced until the new year, you can bet there will be anything from speed metal, double-kick drummers, groove and touch drummers and jazz stylists, to exotic percussion players, orchestral percussionists, and hard hittin’ rock n rollers. This is a hands-on show so come and be a part of it. Never been behind a kit before? Here’s your chance. Participate in a drum circle. Experience the latest electronic drum technology and meet the drummers behind some of your favourite bands. Get a free lesson. Win stuff! Learn stuff!

The voice of the Australian music products industry, the Australian Music Association (AMA) will be teaming up with Australian Musician and other media partners such as Drumscene magazine to present an amazing drum-centric weekend.  Based on the successful model of the Melbourne Guitar Show, the SD&PS will showcase all that is new and exciting in drums and percussion. The show is dedicated solely to all things percussion and its associated technologies and published materials, the exhibition will showcase all the biggest brands in this fiercely loyal product category, plus names and instruments you don’t see every day in your local music store. Plus there will be some special one-off SD&PS deals available over the weekend.

Describing the exciting developments, AMA CEO, Rob Walker says, “”We are excited to be able to present the inaugural Sydney Drum & Percussion Show. We believe it will be a hit if our guitar show in Melbourne is any guide.  We are excited to showcase our industry’s products and the wealth of local talent that Sydney and Australia has to offer and we think that some international guests are not out of the question – we seek to grow our drum & percussion community, educate and entertain.”

If you can hit it, ring it, shake rattle and roll it, it’ll be at the Sydney Drum & Percussion Show

The Sydney Drum & Percussion Show will be held at Rosehill Gardens Grand Pavilion on May 27 & 28, 2017.
Standby for ticket information

SYDNEY DRUM & PERCUSSION SHOW DETAILS
SATURDAY MAY 27 10.00am – 6.00pm
SUNDAY MAY 28 10.00am – 6.00pm

WEBSITE        FACEBOOK     #SD&PS

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CARMINE APPICE: APPICE BROS DRUM WARS OZ TOUR INTERVIEW

Posted in Artists, Interviews, Sydney Drum Show News    //    Post Date - December 8, 2016
Vinny & Carmine Appice photographed at Sound Street Studios in Reseda (CA) on 03/01/13.

Vinny & Carmine Appice photographed at Sound Street Studios in Reseda (CA) on 03/01/13.

Rock music drum royalty comes to town next year when the Appice Brothers, Carmine and Vinny bring their Drum Wars tour to Sydney and Melbourne in February. Carmine’s career spans 50 years as one of rock’s most influential drummers, from his pioneering days with Vanilla Fudge and Beck, Bogert & Appice, to co-writing hit records with  Rod Stewart and sessions with Sly Stone, Pink Floyd, Jan Akkerman and Paul Stanley to mention a few. Carmine’s colourful life was documented this year in his book, ‘STICK IT – My Life of Sex, Drums, and Rock ‘n’ Roll’. Vinny Appice is the metal/heavy rock guy, known for his stick work with classic rock acts such as Black Sabbath, Dio, Heaven and Hell, and Kill Devil Hill. Together in their Drum Wars show, along with a full band, the brothers will play hits from all the great bands they have played with as well as challenging each other in epic drum battles and thumpin’ drum solos. Australian Musician’s Greg Phillips had the pleasure of chatting to CARMINE APPICE about the show, his long career and his drum gear.

What do you hope people come away with when they attend a Drum Wars Show?
The same as what you would when you come to a regular show because it really is a regular rock concert. The only difference is that we’re two brothers playing drums and we do these drum exchanges that they used to do in the Gene Krupa, Buddy Rich jazz days. It hasn’t really been done in the rock realm. So we’d like them to have a good time and hope that they think that I won and not Vinny! I just hope they have a great time. We’re playing hit songs on drums and doing battles, a bit of comedy just a  good time really.

stickitYou released a book this year Stick It: My Life of Sex, Drums, and Rock ‘n’ Roll …
Yeah, I notified my publisher who have the rights to release the book in the UK, New Zealand and Australia, so I asked them to try to put something together for the trip. The book is pretty wild. It’s a realistic account of what happened. We edited some of the crazy stuff out, some of the sex stuff but left some of it in because I wanted everyone to get the feeling when they read the book, that they feel like they were there. We’ve had some great reviews , especially on Amazon. Most of them are five star reviews and they love the fact that it is a very honest book. Sir Rod (Stewart) wrote the intro which was cool. It’s a good representation of my life.

Speaking of Rod, you co-wrote Do Ya Think I’m Sexy with him. There’s a wonderful musical exchange between you and the bass player Philip Chen in that song, such a great groove. Did it take long for you two guys to get that rhythm part down?
Not really. By the time we wrote that song we had already been together for a couple of years, so me and Phil were very tight as a rhythm section. If you listen to the drum and bass breaks we do on Hot Legs, it was tight even then and we’d only been together a year. I was actually originally on the Blow By Blow sessions but we ended up having to blow it out because Jeff Beck and his managers wouldn’t give me and my managers the kind of credit we wanted for it. I spent months over there working on songs and helping Jeff develop that whole concept and Phil was on that record too, so I was working with Phil back then. We started getting tight on those sessions.

Tell me something you get from playing drums that you wouldn’t get from being a guitarist or a keyboard player?
Muscles!  No really, it is all physical. You can actually stay really healthy from playing drums, especially like I do. A lot of times when I am on stage and doing a solo I feel my heart rate is probably up to 130 or so. It’s like being on the treadmill. I think all musicians get the same thing out of music, a very satisfying feeling, especially playing live. Watching other people enjoy it, it is a very satisfying feeling.

You Keep Me Hanging On was such a classic track from Vanilla Fudge. What do you remember about that recording session?
I remember it was done in one take mono. I can’t remember if we went in and overdubbed the vocals. I don’t think so because if we had done that, it wouldn’t have been mono, it would have been stereo I would  think. We did it as a demo and I am pretty sure we did everything at one time. If it wasn’t that way then it might have been the track in one take and then go back and do the vocals. For some reason they released it only in mono. There was never a stereo version of it. Back in those days I didn’t have a clue about recording mono or stereo I didn’t know anything about recording. Thinking about it logically now, when we did the vocals secondary, we would have mixed it in stereo because they did have 8 track. As I always call it, seven and a half minutes that changed my life!

What’s a good tip for recording drums?
Depends how you set things up and what kind of sound you are looking for. I’ve been playing DDrums since 2008. I just got a new kit last week which sounds phenomenal and I can’t wait to record it. I’ve played Slingerland it sounded good, I’ve played Pearl. Pretty much every album I have recorded I have had different makes of drums on them. It’s a matter of how you set it up and what kind of sound you are looking for. Hopefully you know what you are looking for! A lot of guys go into a studio and they don’t have a clue, like I was when I was a kid. I just went in and they recorded my drums the way they were. It was a Gretsch kit with a Rogers snare drum. I think a 1964 Gretsch maple kit with a Rogers chrome snare. The kit sounded great. I had a front head, no hole in it. The front heads with no holes didn’t exist then. That started happening later on early 70s and was more of a California west coast feel. Then it moved to the east coast.

carmine1
Are you a  collector? Do you have a lot of kits?
I try not to have a lot. The ones I do have … it’s not as a collector, it’s just kits that I have had throughout my career. I have my first Mapex kit I got in 1992 which is a great sounding kit, then I have a second Mapex kit which has smaller bass drums, which are birds eye maple. I have a Gene Krupa kit from Slingerland. And before Slingerland closed shop they made me an amazing kit with 4 bass drums, 2 x22’s, 2×24’s, I have  10, 12, 13 normal sized toms, 10×6, 12 x8, 15×9, 16 x16, 18×18 and a wood snare drum and it’s purple leopard, custom made. It’s a Radio King set. It’s the only kit like that in the world. Then I have a 1924 Ludwig  Black Beauty snare drum, a 1940 Slingerland big band wood snare. That’s on the west coast. Then on the east coast, I have a DDrum ES kit which is a duplicate of my Ed Sullivan kit. But I don’t collect drums I just keep some things that I use. I try to get rid of kits so they don’t sit in my cellar here in Connecticut.  Here on the east coast I have a new DDRum max kit which is maple and alder wood together, with a maple finish. My other kit is two bass drums, 24 x14 maple and bubinga toms, normal sized toms except with an 18 x 18 floor tom. I have a Carmine signature brass snare with gold hardware. That one has a sparkle. Then I have another DDRum kit in silver sparkle like that one also but I’ve had it since 2008 and the finish must have been screwed up back then because my silver sparkle is turning champagne, which I don’t care for. And I have a DDrum kit in LA which is a candy apple red maple kit. It sounds good but I think this new max kit sounds better. So I ‘m not a collector as such but I still have 8 or 10 kits still.

You’ve been with Evans Drumheads for a long time. What makes one drum head better than another?
At the time I switched to Evans I was with Aquarian for a long time, 25 years but at the time they were getting out of it and not really doing anything for us. I was offered the deal with Evans. I tried them and they sounded great and we went with them because they took care of us a little better from a business stand-point, you know clinics … getting involved with us. Originally I played Remo then I started playing Ludwig heads, then back to Remo and then to Aquarian in 1989. They made a Carmine model and it was a really great head and I got royalties on it but the royalties don’t make much difference to me. It was more about the commitment from the company and also I gotta like the product. Which is why I went to Istanbul cymbals, who support me around he world. They made me a Carmine model and I got to say they are the best sounding cymbals I have ever played.

PrintDid you rely on music stores for gear when you were growing up?
Not when I was growing up because music stores hadn’t exploded yet. I bought my first kit for 55 bucks from the original Sam Ash store which ended up being a chain. In 1967 or 68 that when they started  expanding to 3 or 4 stores. Then in the 70s it grew more and you had the Guitar Centre. I used to do business with the original Guitar Centre on Sunset Boulevard, now they have 138 stores. The first real drum kit I got was from a guy that worked at Gretsch. He lived on my block and got me the set. There weren’t many music stores back then. More important to me at that time were magazines like Downbeat. There were no rock magazines then, just jazz magazines. I bought the covering for the 26 bass drum from a pawn shop when I was with Vanilla Fudge. I bought a 26 x 16 marching bass drum. I took the white pearl off it and I recovered it with red sparkle to match my regular drums. I bought the red sparkle stuff from an advertisement in Downbeat. There was no Modern Drummer back then. I was in the first issue of Modern Drummer and that wasn’t until 1976. So I grew up in a very different time to a lot of these drummers today. Even Vinny my brother, he was able to go to music stores. When he grew up he had television to watch with music and radio that played all the good stuff and he had the magazines as well.

It’s been great to chat Carmine, we look forward to seeing your Drum Wars show here next year
Well, people should come along, they’ll have a great time.

TOUR DATES
Thursday, February 16: The Factory Theatre, Sydney – DRUM CLINIC
Friday, February 17: The Factory Theatre, Sydney – FULL SHOW
Saturday, February 18: Max Watts, Melbourne FULL SHOW
Sunday, February 19: Croxton Park Hotel, Melbourne – DRUM CLINIC (afternoon)

Full Show tickets are $74.90 for General Admission & $199.90 for VIP Packages
Clinic Tickets are $59.90 for General Admission & $199.90 for VIP Packages

On sale from hardlinemedia.net

Official Event Page: www.facebook.com/events/1444736102219642

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STEVE GADD BAND AUSTRALIAN TOUR

Posted in Blog, Sydney Drum Show News    //    Post Date - October 14, 2016

gadd
STEVE GADD BAND

‘Way Back Home’ Australian Tour 2016 announced

Drumtek Australia and Drumscene Magazine are proud to announce the exclusive and first Australian Tour of the Steve Gadd Band Featuring Michael Landau/guitar, Jimmy Johnson/bass, Kevin Hays/keys and Walt Fowler/trumpet and flugelhorn.

Steve Gadd will be here in December, and fans all over the country will be in a state of high anticipation for seeing the most famous drummer alive, in person! Steve Gadd is a man that truly needs no introduction – particularly within the drumming community and ultimately with musicians all over the world who recognise his genius and immense contribution to music history.

Steve turned 70 last year, and there is no sign of any intention to slow down or retire. He continues to tour extensively with James Taylor and is still first call for Eric Clapton and Paul Simon when available. More recently Steve has been writing and touring with his own STEVE GADD BAND. Featuring the familiar talents of Michael Landau-guitar, Jimmy Johnson-bass, Walt Fowler-flugelhorn and Kevin Hays-keyboards – The Steve Gadd Band has enjoyed great success – both recording and touring their own material as well as just allowing audiences the opportunity to see one of the best line–ups you will ever witness live in concert!

Frank Corniola, Managing Director and owner of Drumtek and DRUMscene, talks about the opportunity to tour the Steve Gadd Band;
“Being a lifelong fan and, like many of my peers, having grown up with the influence of Steve Gadd, it’s been a dream of mine to work with Steve. Now with the opportunity to bring this drumming legend to Australia to perform in a context that his Australian fans have never seen him – with his own band performing many of their own compositions – this is just a rare and incredible once in a lifetime experience that will be enjoyed by drummers and musicians from all around the country.”

National Tour Dates and Venues
BRISBANE – 12 December
The Tivoli
www.thetivoli.net.au
SYDNEY – 13, 14 & 15 December
The Basement
www.thebasement.com.au
MELBOURNE – 18 December
Melbourne Recital Centre – Elisabeth Murdoch Hall
www.melbournerecital.com.au

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